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On Wednesdays We Wear Red

Union members across the country wear red shirts on Wednesday to show solidarity and to make their voices heard by management in a small way. The practice was started by the Communication Workers of America who wear red on Thursdays in order to honor Gerry Hogan, a member who was killed while on the picket line. The practice has taken on even more significance with recent attacks on workers' rights by legislatures across the country.

We encourage you to wear red on Wednesdays and to organize your fellow workers to do the same. Read some tips below, and be sure tag the UAW in your #RedShirtWednesday photos!

 
TIPS FOR ORGANIZING RED SHIRT WEDNESDAY IN YOUR WORKPLACE
  • Let your fellow workers know in advance, and be sure to remind them to wear red.
  • Bring red accessories, such as bandanas, for others to wear in case they forget their shirt (or want to join in once they see everyone else decked out in red).
  • Start small: concentrate on your department or area. A whole department wearing red can have more impact than a few people spread out across a plant.
  • Let people know why you are wearing red; it’s a great conversation starter about the UAW and rights in the workplace.
  • Post pictures on your social media pages, or those of your local. Ask your fellow workers what their union means to them and share your stories.

Visit aflcio.org/halloween to find union-made goodies for this trick or treat holiday!

Since its inception, since we got here as a nation, America has been about the right to allow its citizens to pick and choose our best and most qualified people for public office.

If things are going to change for the better in this country, organized labor must have a seat at the table, Congressman Mark Pocan told UAW CAP delegates Monday. That means that UAW members are essential to what can turn things around on issues such as fair trade, immigration and workers’ rights.

The burden for change falls on organized labor – the people who have fought, marched and put pressure on elected officials for laws and programs that have kept workers safe on their jobs, kept their communities strong and ensured that there was democracy in the workplace.

It’s been two years since members of Local 42 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, voted to join our union, but with a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) now dominated by anti-union members, they continue to be denied their rights, UAW President Dennis Williams told union political activists Sunday.

This week, UAW members will gather in Washington D.C. for the 2018 National Community Action Program (CAP) Conference.

Over 1,100 UAW members will attend the four-day conference, which gives members a look at the union's legislative and political priorities for the coming year. This year's conference will focus on immigration, international trade, job creation, and tax reform.

American consumers can make a difference for working men and women when they buy products made right here in the United States, UAW President Dennis Williams told CAP delegates Sunday night.

The UAW’s BuildBuyUSA Program will launch a video contest as an innovative way to create fun and excitement to supporting goods manufactured here because “we have economic power as working men and women in this country,” Williams said.

The program will launch on March 7 with more details to be released soon.

“We believe things change by the power of the wallet,” said Williams.

CAP Committees Educate Members About the Issues

There’s a direct relationship between the ballot box and the bread box, and what the union fights for and wins at the bargaining table can be taken away in the legislative halls.

-Walter P. Reuther

Workers Outraged, City Councilman Levine “Disappointed” at Columbia’s Decision to Break the Law and Refuse to Bargain with Grad Worker Union

The latest issue of Solidarity magazine is now online!

In this issue, Solidarity takes a look at some of the critical issues ahead of the 2018 midterm elections. From fighting the never-ending attacks on the Affordable Care Act to workers; rights, immigration, investing in our infrastructure and fair trade, we need lawmaker who understand Main Street concerns.

As the German autoworkers’ union IG Metall continued to negotiate with German carmakers, 20,000 workers at Volkswagen’s main plant in Wolfsburg walked away from production lines for two hours to express their determination for a fair collective bargaining agreement. In all, a half million workers have participated in three days of strikes at German assembly plants, parts suppliers and other metal shops.