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Now an International event, Earth Day has been celebrated since April 22, 1970 and its origins are here in the United States.

Detroit — I watched in horror last week and this weekend, along with the rest of our nation, as the headlines rolled in once again with reports of bloodshed, terror, tragedy and sensel

If things are going to change for the better in this country, organized labor must have a seat at the table, Congressman Mark Pocan told UAW CAP delegates Monday. That means that UAW members are essential to what can turn things around on issues such as fair trade, immigration and workers’ rights.

The burden for change falls on organized labor – the people who have fought, marched and put pressure on elected officials for laws and programs that have kept workers safe on their jobs, kept their communities strong and ensured that there was democracy in the workplace.

It’s been two years since members of Local 42 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, voted to join our union, but with a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) now dominated by anti-union members, they continue to be denied their rights, UAW President Dennis Williams told union political activists Sunday.

This week, UAW members will gather in Washington D.C. for the 2018 National Community Action Program (CAP) Conference.

Over 1,100 UAW members will attend the four-day conference, which gives members a look at the union's legislative and political priorities for the coming year. This year's conference will focus on immigration, international trade, job creation, and tax reform.

CAP Committees Educate Members About the Issues

There’s a direct relationship between the ballot box and the bread box, and what the union fights for and wins at the bargaining table can be taken away in the legislative halls.

-Walter P. Reuther

Workers Outraged, City Councilman Levine “Disappointed” at Columbia’s Decision to Break the Law and Refuse to Bargain with Grad Worker Union

The latest issue of Solidarity magazine is now online!

In this issue, Solidarity takes a look at some of the critical issues ahead of the 2018 midterm elections. From fighting the never-ending attacks on the Affordable Care Act to workers; rights, immigration, investing in our infrastructure and fair trade, we need lawmaker who understand Main Street concerns.

As the German autoworkers’ union IG Metall continued to negotiate with German carmakers, 20,000 workers at Volkswagen’s main plant in Wolfsburg walked away from production lines for two hours to express their determination for a fair collective bargaining agreement. In all, a half million workers have participated in three days of strikes at German assembly plants, parts suppliers and other metal shops.

What have we learned from our first year under Republican control of all branches of government? Elections matter. The mid-term election is critically important. And when we vote, we must not be taken in by hollow promises. We must not be distracted or deterred from our course by the peculiar distractions of this government. We must insist on something better from Washington. We do not want more politicians who forget about working families after Election Day.